1825
Table of Contents > Health Dictionary > Inclusion bodies

Inclusion bodies

Distinctive structures frequently formed in the nucleus or cytoplasm (occasionally in both locations) in cells infected with certain filtrable viruses; may be demonstrated by means of various stains, especially Mann eosin methylene blue or Giemsa techniques and visible by light microscopy. Nuclear inclusion bodies are usually acidophilic and are of two morphologic types: 1) granular, hyaline, or amorphous bodies of various sizes, Cowdry type A inclusion bodies, occurring in such diseases as herpes simplex infection or yellow fever; 2) more circumscribed bodies, frequently with several in the same nucleus (and no reaction in adjacent tissue), the type B bodies, occurring in such diseases as Rift Valley fever and poliomyelitis. Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies may be: 1) acidophilic, relatively large, spheric or ovoid, and somewhat granular, as in variola or vaccinia, rabies, and molluscum contagiosum; 2) basophilic, relatively large, complex combinations of viral and cellular material, as i
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