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Manchurian thorn (Aralia mandshurica)

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Also listed as: Aralia mandshurica
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Aralia, Aralia chinensismandshurica, Aralia elata var. mandshurica, Aralia mandshurica, Aralia mandshurica Rupr., Araliaceae (family), ci-lao-yia (Mandarin Chinese), Dimorphanthus mandshuricus, gill, gill old bud, gill Thumbergia, lung bud tree, Magpie does not tread, Manchurian aralia, Manchurian thorn tree, Siberian Aralia mandshurica, tiger yang gill.
  • Selected combination products: A-SupremeT, Adaptaphase IT, Adaptaphase IIT, Adrenal-CareT, AraloxT, EZ-EnergyT, FrutaigaT, KickStart ImmunoBurstT, Prime 1T, PrimoryeT, TonizidT, Tunguska MistT.
  • Note: The closely related A. elata is not discussed in this monograph.

Background
  • Manchurian thorn tree (Aralia mandshurica) is a member of the Araliaceae family and is native to the eastern regions of Russia, northern China, and Korea.
  • The bark, roots, and flowers of Manchurian thorn have been used traditionally to treat a wide range of conditions. Teas made from different parts of the tree were historically used in Russia to treat fatigue, weakness, headaches, depression, immune weakness, and stress.
  • Manchurian thorn is often prepared in combination with other herbs. The combination product AraloxT contains A. mandshurica and Engelhardtia chrysolepis. Research suggests that AraloxT may decrease fat and body weight in non-exercising, obese, otherwise healthy women. Preliminary evidence suggests that Manchurian thorn may protect against some forms of irregular heartbeat and radiation damage.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *


Limited research suggests that AraloxT, which contains both Aralia mandshurica and Engelhardtia chrysolepis, may decrease fat weight and body weight in obese, otherwise healthy, women. Further research is required before conclusions may be made.

C
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia), adaptogen, antiaging, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, anxiety, athletic performance, blood flow enhancement, cardiotonic, depression, diabetes, diuresis, duodenal ulcer, edema, energy metabolism (phospholipid production), enhancing recovery from surgery or illness, fatigue, hepatitis, high cholesterol, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hypoxia, immune enhancer, increases energy, memory enhancement, muscle weakness, nervous system function, neurasthenia, pain, physical work capacity, psychological stress, radiation injuries, rheumatoid arthritis, sexual vigor, stomach ailments.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for Manchurian thorn in adults.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for Manchurian thorn in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in patients with known allergy or hypersensitivity to Aralia mandshurica, its constituents, or members of the Araliaceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Manchurian thorn may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
  • Use cautiously in patients with liver damage or those taking agents that may cause liver damage, as large doses of Manchurian thorn may damage the liver.
  • Avoid in patients with known allergy or hypersensitivity to Aralia mandshurica, its constituents, or members of the Araliaceae family.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • There is a lack of scientific evidence on the use of Manchurian thorn in pregnant or breastfeeding women at this time.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Manchurian thorn may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking insulin or drugs for diabetes by mouth should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
  • Manchurian thorn may interact with agents that may damage the liver, cardiovascular agents, lipid-lowering agents, or weight loss agents.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Manchurian tree thorn may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
  • Manchurian tree thorn may interact with agents that may damage the liver, cardiovascular herbs and supplements, Engelhardtia chrysolepis, foods that affect lipids, lipid-lowering agents, or weight loss agents.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Abidov MT, del Rio MJ, Ramazanov TZ, et al. Effects of and extracts on some parameters of lipid metabolism in women with nondiabetic obesity. Bull Exp Biol Med 2006;141(3):343-346.
  2. Brekhman II, Dardymov IV. New substances of plant origin which increase nonspecific resistance. Annu Rev Pharmacol 1969;9:419-430.
  3. Burgos R, Hancke J, Caceres DD, et al. Hepatotoxic Effect of dried root extract in pigs. Phytother Res 1997;11(1):59-61.
  4. Dong WC. [Determination of total aralosides in grown in Jilin and Liaoning Provinces]. Zhong Yao Tong Bao 1986;11(7):44-46.
  5. Dzhumaeva TI. [Optimization of the extraction process in obtaining a dry extract of the leaves of ]. Farmatsiia 1980;29(3):17-21.
  6. Fu KC, Hsu SK, Wu RH, et al. [Pharmacognostical studies on the Chinese drug ci-lao-yia--the bark of a Rupr. et Maxim]. Yao Xue Xue Bao 1964;11:824-833.
  7. Iakubovskii MM, Pentiuk AA, Khmelnitskii OK, et al. [The activity of the lipid peroxidation processes in the mucosa of the rat small intestine and its morphofunctional state under acute irradiation and the administration of combined preparations created on a base of highly dispersed silica]. Radiats Biol Radioecol 1997;37(3):366-371.
  8. Iskenderov GB. [The metabolism of araloside A]. Farmakol Toksikol 1991;54(6):33-35.
  9. Lishmanov IuB, Maslov LN, Arbuzov AG, et al. [Cardioprotective, inotropic, and anti-arrhythmia properties of a complex adaptogen "Tonizid"]. Eksp Klin Farmakol 2008;71(3):15-22.
  10. Lutomski J, Gorecki P, Halasa J. [Immunologische Eigenschaften der Saponosidfraktion aus ]. Planta Med 1981;42(6):116-117.
  11. Mal'chukovskii LB, Takhtobaeva GM, Kopylova IE, et al. [Determination of the sum of aralosides A, B, C in the roots of ]. Farmatsiia 1972;21(6):45-47.
  12. Martinez B, Staba EJ. The physiological effects of , and on exercised rats. Jpn J Pharmacol 1984;35(2):79-85.
  13. Maslov LN, Guzarova NV. [Cardioprotective and antiarrhythmic properties of preparations from , , and ]. Eksp Klin Farmakol 2007;70(6):48-54.
  14. Maslov LN, Lishmanov YB, Arbuzov AG, et al. Antiarrhythmic activity of phytoadaptogens in short-term ischemia-reperfusion of the heart and postinfarction cardiosclerosis. Bull Exp Biol Med 2009;147(3):331-4.
  15. Zhuravlev IuN, Artiukova EV, Kozyrenko MM, et al. [Genetic relationships among Far Eastern species of the family Araliacea inferred by RAPD analysis]. Genetika 2003;39(1):57-63.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.


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