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Jointed flatsedge (Cyperus articulatus)

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Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Adrue, benzoquinone, chintul, cyperenone, cyperus, Cyperus articulatus, diosmetin, flavonoids, geranial, germacrene-D, guinea rush, jointed flat sedge, limonene, linalool, menthol, orientin, piripiri, saponins, silolo, sugars, tannins, terpenes, vicenin 2.

Background
  • Jointed flatsedge (Cyperus articulatus) is used in traditional medicine in Africa and Asia. It is commonly found in the Nile River region and is also used in Jamaica. Adrue is often used as the "medicine" from the rhizome of jointed flatsedge and is thought to be the plant's active ingredient.
  • Jointed flatsedge has been used for many different illnesses including digestive disorders and menstrual irregularity and it has been used for its sedative properties. It has also been investigated in animal studies for its anticonvulsant and antimicrobial properties.
  • Currently there are no high-quality human studies available to recommend jointed flatsedge.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Abdominal pain, anticonvulsant, antifungal, antimicrobial, bloody urine, breast pain (mastalgia), carminative (digestive aid), colic, digestive disorders, epilepsy, headache, menstruation irregularities, muscle relaxant, nausea, pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting, sedative, vaginal discharge, vomiting.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for jointed flatsedge. Traditionally, 10-30 minums of liquid jointed flatsedge extract has been used (1 minum=1/8 of a fluid ounce).

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for jointed flatsedge in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to jointed flatsedge (Cyperus articulatus) or any members of the Cyperaecae family. Members of the Cyperaecae family have been shown to be potent airborne pollens and have shown cross-reactivity with other pollen allergens.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • There is currently no high-quality human or scientific data available that reports adverse effects of jointed flatsedge (Cyperus articulatus). Drowsiness or sedation may occur. Use caution if driving or operating heavy machinery.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

  • Jointed flatsedge is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Although not well studied in humans, jointed flatsedge (Cyperus articulatus) may have anticonvulsant properties. Caution is advised in patients taking anti-epileptic agents due to possible additive effects.
  • Although not well studied in humans, jointed flatsedge (Cyperus articulatus) may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines such as lorazepam (Ativan®) or diazepam (Valium®), barbiturates such as phenobarbital, narcotics such as codeine, some antidepressants, and alcohol. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.

Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

  • Although not well studied in humans, jointed flatsedge (Cyperus articulatus) may have sedating properties. Drowsiness may occur. Use caution if driving or operating heavy machinery.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Bum EN, Lingenhoehl K, Rakotonirina A, et al. Ions and amino acid analysis of Cyperus articulatus L. (Cyperaceae) extracts and the effects of the latter on oocytes expressing some receptors. J Ethnopharmacol. 2004;95(2-3):303-309.
  2. Bum EN, Meier CL, Urwyler S, et al. Extracts from rhizomes of Cyperus articulatus (Cyperaceae) displace [3H]CGP39653 and [3H]glycine binding from cortical membranes and selectively inhibit NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission. J Ethnopharmacol. 1996;54(2-3):103-111.
  3. Bum EN, Schmutz M, Meyer C, et al. Anticonvulsant properties of the methanolic extract of Cyperus articulatus (Cyperaceae). J Ethnopharmacol. 2001;76(2):145-150.
  4. Duarte MC, Figueira GM, Sartoratto A, et al. Anti-Candida activity of Brazilian medicinal plants. J Ethnopharmacol. 2-28-2005;97(2):305-311.
  5. Mongelli E, Desmarchelier C, Coussio J, et al. [Antimicrobial activity and interaction with DNA of medicinal plants from the Peruvian Amazon region]. Rev Argent Microbiol. 1995;27(4):199-203.
  6. Ngo Bum E, Rakotonirina A, Rakotonirina SV, et al. Effects of Cyperus articulatus compared to effects of anticonvulsant compounds on the cortical wedge. J Ethnopharmacol. 2003;87(1):27-34.
  7. Rakotonirina VS, Bum EN, Rakotonirina A, et al. Sedative properties of the decoction of the rhizome of Cyperus articulatus. Fitoterapia 2001;72(1):22-29.
  8. Singh AB, Kumar P. Aeroallergens in clinical practice of allergy in India. An overview. Ann Agric.Environ.Med 2003;10(2):131-136.
  9. Wei L, Chen B, Ye R, et al. Treatment of complications due to peritoneal dialysis for chronic renal failure with traditional Chinese medicine. J Tradit Chin Med 1999;19(1):3-9.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.


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