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Corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas)

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Also listed as: Papaver rhoeas
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Alkaloids, anthocyanins, astragaline, coptisine, depsides, field poppy, Flanders poppy, flavonoids, glaudine, glycosides, hyperoside, hypolaetin, isocorydine, isoquercitrine, kaempferol, luteolin, Papaveraceae (family), Papaver rhoeas, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, quercetin, red corn poppy, red poppy, rhoeadine, stylopine, wild poppy.

Background
  • Corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas) is well known for its showy red flowers and should not be confused with the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). In the Mediterranean, corn poppy greens are eaten as a vegetable.
  • Corn poppy extracts may reduce morphine withdrawal symptoms. However, there is insufficient available evidence in humans to support the use of corn poppy for any indication. Corn poppy may have iron-chelating activities and should be used cautiously in patients undergoing chelation therapy, or with thalassemia or anemia.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Antioxidant, chelating agent (heavy metals), food uses, gastric ulcers, morphine withdrawal, sedative.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for corn poppy in adults.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for corn poppy in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to corn poppy. Corn poppy flowers may cause hives in allergic individuals.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Corn poppy is likely safe when the leaves, petals, and seeds are used in food amounts.
  • There is little information currently available about the adverse effects associated with corn poppy. However, there have been reports of contact urticaria (hives) due to the flowers.
  • Use cautiously in patients undergoing chelation therapy, with thalassemia (blood disorders), or with anemia (red blood cell deficiency), as corn poppy may have iron-chelating activities.
  • Use cautiously in patients taking sedatives, as corn poppy may cause drowsiness.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Corn poppy is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Corn poppy may have antioxidant properties.
  • Corn poppy root may have potent antiulcerogenic effects. Use cautiously with anti-ulcer medications due to possible additive effects.
  • Corn poppy greens may possess iron-chelating activities. Use cautiously with heavy metal antagonists, chelating agents, and iron salts.
  • Corn poppy extracts may decrease morphine withdrawal symptoms.
  • Corn poppy may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines such as lorazepam (Ativan®) or diazepam (Valium®), barbituates such as Phenobarbital, narcotics such as codeine, some antidepressants, and alcohol. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Corn poppy may have antioxidant properties.
  • Corn poppy root may have potent antiulcerogenic effects. Use cautiously with anti-ulcer herbs and supplements due to possible additive effects.
  • Corn poppy greens may possess iron-chelating activities. Use cautiously with heavy metal antagonists, chelating agents, and iron supplements.
  • Corn poppy extracts may decrease morphine withdrawal symptoms.
  • Corn poppy may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Awe W, Winkler W. [Alkaloids of corn poppy.]. Arch Pharm Ber.Dtsch.Pharm Ges 1957;290/62(8-9):367-376.
  2. El Masry S, El Ghazooly MG, Omar AA, et al. Alkaloids from Egyptian Papaver rhoeas. Planta Med 1981;41(1):61-64.
  3. El SN, Karakaya S. Radical scavenging and iron-chelating activities of some greens used as traditional dishes in Mediterranean diet. Int J Food Sci Nutr 2004;55(1):67-74.
  4. Franchi GG, Franchi G, Corti P, et al. Microspectrophotometric evaluation of digestibility of pollen grains. Plant Foods Hum.Nutr 1997;50(2):115-126.
  5. Gamboa PM, Jauregui I, Urrutia I, et al. Allergic contact urticaria from poppy flowers (Papaver rhoeas). Contact Dermatitis 1997;37(3):140-141.
  6. Gurbuz I, Ustun O, Yesilada E, et al. Anti-ulcerogenic activity of some plants used as folk remedy in Turkey. J Ethnopharmacol 2003;88(1):93-97.
  7. Hillenbrand M, Zapp J, Becker H. Depsides from the petals of Papaver rhoeas. Planta Med. 2004;70(4):380-382.
  8. Pfeifer S. [On the occurrence of glaudine in opium and Papaver rhoeas L.]. Pharmazie 1965;20(4):240.
  9. Pourmotabbed A, Rostamian B, Manouchehri G, et al. Effects of Papaver rhoeas extract on the expression and development of morphine-dependence in mice. J Ethnopharmacol 2004;95(2-3):431-435.
  10. Sahraei H, Faghih-Monzavi Z, Fatemi SM, et al. Effects of Papaver rhoeas extract on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice. Phytother Res 2006;20(9):737-741.
  11. Sahraei H, Fatemi SM, Pashaei-Rad S, et al. Effects of Papaver rhoeas extract on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mice. J Ethnopharmacol 2-20-2006;103(3):420-424.
  12. Schaffer S, Schmitt-Schillig S, Muller WE, et al. Antioxidant properties of Mediterranean food plant extracts: geographical differences. J Physiol Pharmacol 2005;56 Suppl 1:115-124.
  13. Soulimani R, Younos C, Jarmouni-Idrissi S, et al. Behavioral and pharmaco-toxicological study of Papaver rhoeas L. in mice. J Ethnopharmacol 3-3-2001;74(3):265-274.
  14. Winkler W, Awe W. [On the structure of rhoeadine isomers isolated from Papaver rhoeas.]. Arch Pharm 1961;294/66:301-306.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.


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