Table of Contents > Herbs & Supplements > Pleurisy (Asclepias tuberosa) Print

Pleurisy (Asclepias tuberosa)

Image

Also listed as: Asclepias tuberosa
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Asclepiadaceae (family), Asclepias tuberose, butterfly milkweed, butterfly weed, chigger-weed, pleurisy root.

Background
  • Pleurisy (Asclepias tuberosa) is found throughout most of the United States, except for the Pacific Northwest. Among gardeners, the plant is better known as butterfly weed or butterfly milkweed, as its showy reddish-orange flowers attract butterflies. In the past, pleurisy was used for pulmonary conditions, such as asthma and bronchitis. However, there is insufficient evidence currently available in humans to support the use of pleurisy for any indication.
  • Some natural medicine textbooks say that pleurisy contains large amounts of cardiac glycosides; therefore, large doses should be avoided and pleurisy should be used cautiously in patients with cardiovascular (heart) conditions or taking cardiac glycosides.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Asthma, bronchitis, laxative (purgative), wound healing.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose of pleurisy in adults.

Children (younger than 18 years)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose of pleurisy in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to pleurisy (Asclepias tuberosa) or its constituents.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • There is insufficient evidence in humans to support the use of pleurisy for any indication, and there are very few available reports on side effects. Nonetheless, use cautiously in patients with heart conditions or taking cardiac glycosides, as some natural medicine textbooks say that pleurisy contains large amounts of cardiac glycosides.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Pleurisy is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Although not well studied in humans, pleurisy may alter amine concentrations in the brain and interact with antidepressants.
  • The roots of the pleurisy plant have been found to contain glycosides of ikemagenin, lineolon, pleurogenin, ascandroside, cardenolide, uzarigenin, coroglaucigenin, and corotoxigenin. Some natural medicine textbooks say that pleurisy contains large amounts of cardiac glycosides; therefore, large doses should be avoided and pleurisy should be used cautiously in patients with cardiovascular (heart) conditions or taking cardiac glycosides, including digoxin.
  • Although not well studied in humans, pleurisy may contain estrogen-like compounds. Caution is advised when taking pleurisy with other hormonal agents.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Although not well studied in humans, pleurisy may alter amine concentrations in the brain and interact with antidepressants. Caution is advised when taking pleurisy with other herbs with potential antidepressant effects.
  • The roots of the pleurisy plant have been found to contain glycosides of ikemagenin, lineolon, pleurogenin, ascandroside, cardenolide, uzarigenin, coroglaucigenin, and corotoxigenin. Some natural medicine textbooks say that pleurisy contains large amounts of cardiac glycosides; therefore, large doses should be avoided and pleurisy should be used cautiously in patients with cardiovascular (heart) conditions or taking herbs with cardiac glycoside effects, such as hawthorn.
  • Although not well studied in humans, pleurisy is thought to contain estrogen-like compounds. Caution is advised when taking pleurisy with other hormone-containing herbs or supplements.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Abe F, Yamauchi T. An androstane bioside and 3'-thiazolidinone derivatives of doubly-linked cardenolide glycosides from the roots of Asclepias tuberosa. Chem Pharm Bull.(Tokyo) 2000;48(7):991-993.
  2. Abe F, Yamauchi T. Pregnane glycosides from the roots of Asclepias tuberosa. Chem Pharm Bull.(Tokyo) 2000;48(7):1017-1022.
  3. Petricic J. [On the cardenolides of roots of Asclepias tuberosa L.]. Arch Pharm Ber.Dtsch.Pharm Ges 1966;299(12):1007-1011.
  4. Torbert HA, Prior SA, Runion GB, et al. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in a Model Longleaf Pine Community as Affected by Elevated Atmospheric CO(2). Environ.Manage. 12-4-2003.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.


Mon 8 am - 8 pm
Tue 8 am - 8 pm
Wed 8 am - 8 pm
Thu 8 am - 8 pm
Fri 8 am - 8 pm
Sat 8 am - 8 pm
Sun 9 am - 7 pm

1096 Helena Ave.
Helena, MT 59601
(406)443-5150
(406)443-5154 (fax)
Email Our Store
Driving Directions
Real Food Market & Deli Online Coupons
Healthy Living Marketplace
Nutribiotic
Garden Of Life
Now Food
Now Food
Natural Vitality
Now Food