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Albizia (Albizia julibrissin)

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Also listed as: Albizia julibrissin, Silk tree, Mimosa
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Adianthifoliosides A and B, albibrissinosides A and B, Albizia adianthifolia, Albizia amara, Albizia anthelmintica, Albiziafalcataria, Albizia grandibracteata, Albizia gummifera, Albizia inopinata, Albizia julibrissin Durazz, Albizia julibrisson, Albizia lebbeck, Albizia lebek, Albizia Lucidior I. Nielsen, Albizia myriophylla, Albizia odoratissima, Albizia procera, Albizia rhizonse, Albizia saman, Albizia schimperana, Albizia versicolor, Albizia zygia, albiziasaponins, Albizzia, algarrobo de olor, alkaloids, black siris, budmunchiamines, cardiac glycosides, Cha-em Thai, Cortex Albiziae, daidzein, (E)-4-hydroxy-dodec-2-enedioic acid, falcata wood, flavonoids, glycosides, grandibracteosides A-C, gul-i abrisham (Persian), gummiferaosides, Fabaceae (family), hehuanoside A, isoflavones, isookanin, julibrissin, julibrosides, kuraridin, kuraridinol, kurarinol, kurarinone, Leguminosae (family), licorice-saponin F3, lupeol, lupenone, luteolin, macrocyclic alkaloids, mimosa, Moussena, phenols, Pit shirish shirisha, sapogenin 21-[4-(ethylidene)-2-tetrahydrofuranmethacryloyl] machaerinic acid, saponins, scented carob, silk flower, silk tree, sophoflavescenol, soya-cerebroside I, steroids, (-)-syringaresinol-4-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, tannins, triterpene saponins, triterpenoidal prosapogenins, vitalboside-A, vitalboside-A 2'-methylglucuronate, yunganoside B1.
  • Selected combination products: Aller-7/NR-A2 (Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale, and Piper longum).

Background
  • Albizia (Albizia julibrissin), also called mimosa or silk tree, is an herb that is native to southern and eastern Asia, from Iran to China and Korea. It is an ornamental tree that produces fine red filamentous flowers during the summer. The bark is harvested in the spring or late summer and is dried for later use.
  • It has been suggested that Albizia may useful for anxiety and depression. The flower heads of Albizia have been used traditionally as a carminative (to reduce gas from the intestines), digestive aid, sedative, and tonic. They have also been used to treat insomnia, irritability, breathlessness, and poor memory. The stem bark has also been used as a pain reliever, anthelmintic (to expel parasitic worms), diuretic (to increase the rate of urination), oxytocic (to facilitate childbirth), stimulant, and to treat boils and carbuncles (abscesses). When applied to the skin, the stem bark has been used to promote wound healing and reduce swelling. A gummy extract from the plant has been used as a plaster for abscesses and boils and as a retentive for fractures and sprains.
  • There is a lack of human research supporting the use of Albizia for any condition.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Abscesses, allergic rhinitis, allergy (atopic), analgesic (pain reliever), anaphylaxis (life-threatening allergic reaction), anthelmintic (rids of parasitic worms), antibacterial, antifungal (antimicrobial), antioxidant, antispasmodic (suppresses spasms), anxiety, asthma, astringent, boils (abscesses), bronchitis, cancer, carbuncles (abscesses), carminative (prevents gas), depression, diabetes mellitus (non-insulin dependent), diarrhea, digestive aid, diuretic (increases rate of urination), dysentery (intestinal infection), fatigue, fractures, hay fever, hemorrhoids, hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol), immunomodulation (modulation of the immune system), improved blood circulation, inflammation, insect bites/stings (scorpion), insomnia, irritability, labor induction, malaria, memory, mood enhancement, muscle relaxant, night vision, sedative, skin conditions (eczema and hives), snake bite, sprains, stimulant, swelling, tonic, wound healing.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • Various doses have been studied, but there is no proven effective dose for Albizia. 3-6 milliliters (higher doses by decoction) of a 1:2 fluid extract of Albizia has been taken daily. Based on manufacturer data, 1.25-6.25 milliliters of Albizia liquid extract (1:2) has been taken daily. A dose of 1.25 milliliters of Albizia liquid extract has been taken five times daily and doses of Albizia up to 6 grams, as a powder, tea, or tincture, have been used daily.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for Albizia in children. A mouthwash of Cha-em Thai (Albiziamyriophylla) has been taken twice daily for two weeks.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with known allergy/hypersensitivity to Albizia, its constituents, or members of the Fabaceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Sedation and asthma have been reported.
  • Use cautiously in women who are pregnant or trying to become pregnant.
  • Use cautiously in individuals taking drugs that may affect how the immune system functions.
  • Use cautiously in individuals taking antidepressants or drugs that depress the central nervous system.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Albizia is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Albizia may have antimalarial effects and interfere with how drugs, such as chloroquine, are processed in the body.
  • Albizia may have anticonvulsant effects. Caution is advised in patients taking anticonvulsants since the effects of Albizia with anticonvulsant agents are not well understood.
  • Albizia may have antihistamine effects. Caution is advised in patients taking antihistamines since the effects of Albizia with antihistamines are not well understood.
  • Albizia has been shown to induce tumor cell death and may possess antiproliferative effects. Caution is advised in patients taking anticancer called antineoplastics since the effects of Albizia with antineoplastics are not well understood.
  • Albizia may have anti-inflammatory effects. Caution is advised when taking medications that also have anti-inflammatory effects since the effects of Albizia with anti-inflammatory agents are not well understood.
  • Albizia may decrease dopamine levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also affect dopamine levels.
  • Albizia may decrease GABA levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also affect GABA levels.
  • Albizia may alter or interfere with the effects of fertility agents.
  • Albizia may alter how the immune system functions. Caution is advised when using medications that may also modulate the immune system.
  • Albizia may increase serotonin levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also increase serotonin levels, such as antidepressants.
  • Albizia may cause sedation. Caution is advised when using medications that may also cause sedation, such as central nervous system depressants.
  • Albizia may have antibacterial effects. Caution is advised when using antibiotics.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Albizia may have antimalarial effects and interfere with how antimalarial herbs or supplements are processed in the body.
  • Albizia may have anticonvulsant effects. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements that are anticonvulsants since the effects of Albizia with anticonvulsants are not well understood.
  • Albizia may have antihistamine effects. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements that are antihistamines since the effects of Albizia with antihistamines are not well understood.
  • Albizia may have anti-inflammatory effects. Caution is advised when taking anti-inflammatory herbs or supplements since the effects of Albizia with anti-inflammatory agents are not well understood.
  • Albizia has been shown to induce tumor cell death and may possess antiproliferative effects. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements that are antineoplastics since the effects of Albizia with antineoplastics are not well understood.
  • Albizia may have antioxidant effects. Caution is advised when taking antioxidants since the effects of Albizia with antioxidants are not well understood.
  • Albizia may decrease dopamine levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also affect dopamine levels.
  • Albizia may alter or interfere with the effects of fertility agents.
  • Albizia may decrease GABA levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also affect GABA levels.
  • Albizia may alter how the immune system functions. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also modulate the immune system.
  • Albizia may increase serotonin levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also increase serotonin levels, such as antidepressants.
  • Albizia may cause sedation. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also cause sedation, such as central nervous system depressants.
  • Albizia may have antibacterial effects. Caution is advised when using antibacterials.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Amornchat, C, Kraivaphan, P, Dhanabhumi, C, et al. Effect of Cha-em Thai mouthwash on salivary levels of mutans streptococci and total IgA. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health 2006;37(3):528-531.
  2. Barua CC, Gupta PP, Patnaik GK, et al. Immunomodulatory effect of lebbeck. Pharmaceutical Biology (Netherlands) 2000;38:161-166.
  3. Geyid, A, Abebe, D, Debella, A et al. Screening of some medicinal plants of Ethiopia for their anti-microbial properties and chemical profiles. J Ethnopharmacol 3-21-2005;97(3):421-427.
  4. Gupta, R S, Chaudhary, R, Yadav, R et al. Effect of Saponins of Albizia lebbeck (L.) Benth bark on the reproductive system of male albino rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 1-4-2005;96(1-2):31-36.
  5. Jung, M J, Chung, H Y, Kang, S S, et al. Antioxidant activity from the stem bark of Albizzia julibrissin. Arch Pharm Res. 2003;26(6):458-462.
  6. Kang, T H, Jeong, S J, Kim, N Y, et al. Sedative activity of two flavonol glycosides isolated from the flowers of Albizzia julibrissin Durazz. J Ethnopharmacol. 2000;71(1-2):321-323.
  7. Kasture, V S, Chopde, C T, and Deshmukh, V. K. Anticonvulsive activity of Albizzia lebbeck, Hibiscus rosa sinesis and Butea monosperma in experimental animals. J Ethnopharmacol 2000;71(1-2):65-75.
  8. Moshi MJ, Mbwambo ZH. Experience of Tanzanian traditional healers in the management of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Pharmaceutical Biology 2002;40:552-560
  9. Tomioka, K, Kumagai, S, Kameda, M, et al. A case of occupational asthma induced by falcata wood (Albizia falcataria). J Occup Health 2006;48(5):392-395.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.


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